Relationships & Revenue

When Marketing Doesn't Matter

Sam Frentzel-Beyme Follow Managing Partner & Strategy Director

The Short of It

  • Many people initiate strategies that reflect a belief that marketing can solve inherent core product or service related problems.
  • When a core product or service is unclear or not compelling, marketing becomes part of the chatter that most people naturally tune out.
  • If you want to make your marketing matter, then, oddly enough, you have to focus less on what you want to say and more on what your product or service actually does.

I often hear a lot about how much marketing is needed for a project and the necessity of building a strong strategic communications plan that seamlessly integrates traditional media, print, online and a variety of other touchpoints.

All good, right?

Not so fast.

Often the goal of doing more along the communications spectrum means delving less deep in terms of each individual connection and that can mean less of a real emotionally relevant connection with your audience.

Further, focusing on doing more with communications can sometimes take away critical time from what the marketing is supposed to be all about – the core product or service.

While many people would argue that they disagree with the old “build a better mousetrap” philosophy where customers are expected to simply show up, the truth is that many people initiate strategies that reflect a belief that marketing can solve inherent core product or service related problems.

That fact is that when your core product or service is unclear or not compelling, marketing becomes part of the chatter that most people naturally tune out. You become part of the background. If you want to make your marketing matter, then, oddly enough, you have to focus less on what you want to say and more on what your product or service actually does.

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